Top Websites For Freelance Writers in 2017

Finding paid writing work is tough. In fact, finding that very first paid writing gig can take months. I’ve learned that you have to be persistent when it comes to writing, even when you feel like quitting. Trust me, hard work always pays off. Something that you should remember is that what works for one writer might not work for another. So, if there’s one website that you’re not having any luck with, just know that there are lots of other opportunities out there.

Here are some of the websites that I’ve found to be the best so far.

Freelance Writing Gigs

This is a great website to find the best writing gigs. If you’re very busy and you don’t have time to look at various job boards, then this would definitely be a great place to look. There’s a list of new writing gigs Monday – Friday and with a range of content wiring and blogging jobs, there’s a good chance you’ll find something on there that suits you. I’ve found work through this website!

Pro Blogger

Even though I’ve never found a paid writing job directly through this website, I know of other writers who find regular work on there. Of course, most of the jobs posted on here will also be found on the site above but not all of them are, so it’s worth having a look on there to see if there’s any that you might have missed.

Twitter

Not everyone realises it but social media is a great way to find writing jobs that you wouldn’t normally find elsewhere. Searching through the “#writerswanted” and “#bloggerwanted” tag can help you find some new opportunities. You can play around with the wording and search for something that is more specific to the work that you’re looking for. It can be very hit and miss but I’ve found a couple of paid writing gigs through the site!

Fiverr

To be honest, I have mixed feelings about this website. It can be a great way to earn extra income but that all depends on the job that you’re providing. Some freelancers have luck with Fiverr, others can’t even make one sale. I’ve only managed to make a couple of sales but perhaps that’s because I haven’t dedicated enough time to promoting my gigs. Either way, it’s worth checking out this site as it might be something that works for you or someone you know.

People Per Hour

Although I created an account a while ago, I’ve only started using it recently and I’ve found that it’s a really good website to find regular or one-off writing gigs. There’s also a lot of other work you can find on there, like social media, web development, and admin. Depending on your experience level, you can search for entry, intermediate and expert level jobs. You’re bound to find something on there.

For now, these are the main websites that I check regularly for writing work. I’ll be sure to update if I find any others that might be useful. Just remember to be persistent and don’t be disheartened when you’re not landing any writing gigs. It just takes time.

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What Freelance Writing Has Taught Me

When I first started writing it was a hobby that I absolutely loved. It sounds a cliche, but I didn’t think for a second that it would become my career. It was just something I did because I enjoyed doing it.

I didn’t write for other people to read my work. I wrote for myself and myself only. That’s the mentality you have to carry with you into the world of freelance writing because trust me, it’s not easy.

Taking that leap from writing part-time to writing full-time is a big risk. I didn’t have a clue what I was doing but I was sure that I wanted to write for a living, so I convinced myself that that was enough. There’s a misconception that being a writer is quite simple: You write. How easy is that? I’ll be the first to admit that’s exactly what I assumed. I envied successful bloggers because I thought it must be one of the easiest careers in the world, but now I’m eating my words. It’s so much more than writing. It’s sending emails, it’s replying to emails, it’s skipping lunch because you really need to finish that article you’ve spent far too long editing (guilty), it’s promoting yourself on social media, it’s looking on writing job boards almost every day to make extra income that month. And breathe.

Before I became a full-time freelance writer I knew nothing about formatting, WordPress, or promoting myself. That’s something that I had to learn through experience. In fact, there’s still so much I don’t understand and perhaps it will take me a long time to grasp everything, but I’m still learning. The main thing I stick by is consistency. As long as I’m regularly producing content, researching, and learning new skills then I know that I’ll be able to improve as a freelance writer and hopefully increase my income.

Despite all of that, the most important thing is to write things that I enjoy writing. I’ll admit that there have been times when I’ve written a post about something I had no interest in just because the pay was great. And sure, sometimes that’s what you have to do. It’s a job. But I don’t feel myself when I write about topics that I have no experience in. The words feel forced. I read it back and the tone doesn’t seem right and I wonder if any of the readers can pick up on my false enthusiasm. I never want to lose sight of the reason why I started writing in the first place.

Honestly, I’ve never once said that I hated my job. There are some days when the words aren’t flowing or the ideas aren’t forming and I convince myself that maybe, just maybe, writing isn’t for me. But then I’ll have an amazing day or week or month when I feel like this is what I want to do for the rest of my life. It’s something that I’ve just had to accept. The highs are high and the lows are low.

Of course, I’m going to complain sometimes. That’s what happens when you make the transition of writing as a hobby to writing for a living. It’s a business, which means that I’m responsible for how much I get paid each month. That can be scary. I’ve discovered that it’s trial and error with this type of work. I prefer working 9 – 5 because it’s the only way for me to stay focused. I prefer writing in silence because music is the worst kind of distraction. I prefer a few consistent writing jobs rather than a long stream of one-off writing gigs because it’s easier for me to keep on top of it.

To put it simply, no two freelance writers are the same. That’s what I’ve discovered so far.

If you’d like to support my blog/writing: paypal.me/Coralle

Why I quit my job to become a freelance writer

That’s right – I quit my job without another one lined up. Stupid decision? Probably. But it worked out OK in the end.

Back in January I started working at a photo shop (I’m not giving away the actual name) as a Sales Assistant. I hadn’t had much previous experience and I felt incredibly shy and a little bit awkward. The manager was lovely, in fact that was the only reason I didn’t leave on the very first day. I kept being encouraged to stay, to see how things go, and needless to say I realised it just wasn’t working. I cringed every time someone walked into the shop, felt my heart hammering in my chest whenever I had to serve someone, not to mention the number of times I cried whenever I made a mistake. I wouldn’t say I couldn’t do it, but my heart wasn’t in it. Each day I dreaded going in – not the usual ‘oh, I don’t fancy going into work today’ dread – but more of ‘I feel like I’m suffocating and on the verge of a breakdown’ kind of dread.

I had a long chat with the manager, who as kind as she was, offered me tons of advice. She reminded me that I had to do whatever it took to make myself happy, and that if I wasn’t happy being there, I should go. And I did. I left that day feeling like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders, as if I could breathe again. But the next day I felt awful. I just kept thinking what have I done?  I’d quit before I had even given it a chance and already I regretted it. Although deep down I knew for the sake of my mental health I couldn’t have stayed another day. The decision might have been selfish but sometimes putting yourself first is the thing you need to do the most. So I spent the next few months looking for writing jobs. The truth is I love writing; it gave me a voice I didn’t even know I had. I thrived off every like, every comment, every share, and I knew that I had to keep going.

The life of a freelance writer is hard to say the least. Finding that first paid writing gig can take months, but it could be done, I knew that much. So I started writing for various websites for free, gaining exposure and experience along the way. I checked job sites and writing boards everyday. I sent out email after email, and despite most of them being ignored, a handful of them actually replied. Now I have several clients of whom I regularly communicate with. And although I’m not exactly where I want to be, and I know I do have a long way to go, I feel happier.

Here’s the secret: if you persist, you can get almost anything you want.